FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

For your convenience, we have broken out our FAQ section  by specific departments.  Please select a department to view the most commonly asked questions.  If you have a question that is not listed, please feel free to contact us.

Read FAQs about our partner agencies

DEQ

Department of Environmental Quality

GRDA

Grand River Dam Authority

LPGA

LP Gas Administration

OCC

Oklahoma Corporation Commission

ODOM

Oklahoma Department of Mines

ODWC

Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

OERB

Oklahoma Energy Resources Board

OGS

Oklahoma Geological Survey

OMPA

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority

OWRB

Oklahoma Water Resources Board

Department of Environmental Quality

We receive many questions from Oklahoma citizens and businesses through our Customer Service hotline and AskDEQ email. To improve services, these Frequently Asked Questions were developed to address the vast majority of inquiries we receive. If you don’t see what you’re looking for, please contact the Customer Service hotline at (800) 869-1400 or email us at AskDEQ.

For more information, please visit deq.ok.gov

Other information that might be helpful:

Drought and Water Conservation Information: http://www.deq.state.ok.us/conservation/index.html

Learn About Chemicals Stored in Your Community: http://www.deq.state.ok.us/lpdnew/saratitleiii/ChemicalsStoredinyourCommunity.htm

Asbestos is covered by the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) and EPA has delegated responsibility to regulate this NESHAP to Oklahoma DEQ. The asbestos NESHAP contains several requirements regarding demolition, renovation, and disposal of asbestos.

DEQ has prepared an informative fact sheet that explains many of the asbestos NESHAP requirements including notifications to DEQ, demolition/renovation requirements, and disposal requirements. If you have additional questions about the asbestos NESHAP, please contact one of our asbestos experts in DEQ’s Air Quality Division at (405) 702-4100.

All questions pertaining to billings, invoices, or payments should be directed to DEQ’s Accounts Receivable HelpDesk via email or by calling (405) 702-1130.

In most cases, open burning is prohibited due to potential air contamination and detrimental health effects to people. The two most common forms of acceptable burning are:

  • yard brush – if the brush is burned on the property where it is generated, and
  • household trash – if it is burned on the property where it is generated AND no collection and disposal service is reasonably available.

When burning is authorized, it can be performed only if the following requirements are met:

  • It does not cause a public nuisance or violate a local ordinance.
  • It does not create a visibility hazard on any roadway, rail line, or air field.
  • It does not adversely affect the ambient air quality of a city or town.
  • It is conducted only between three hours after sunrise and three hours before sunset.
  • It is not done on days when DEQ has issued an ozone or particulate matter watch.

We have prepared a very informative fact sheet providing more information about open burning. If you see what you believe may be unauthorized open burning, you may file a complaint with DEQ by either filling out the online form or contacting our 24-hour hotline at (800) 522-0206. Please include as much information as possible.

If you wish to file an environmental complaint, you may either click the button below

or contact our 24-hour hotline at (800) 522-0206. Please include as much information as possible.

If you would like copies of inspection reports for businesses regulated by DEQ, contact Central Records by email or at (405) 702-1188. Please be sure to include the name of the business, former names if known, and the street address. Additionally, EPA maintains a public website for compliance and enforcement history for regulated businesses across the US.

Composting is a natural process to break down organic matter and convert it to a useable material for use in gardens. DEQ has prepared a very informative fact sheet to help you get started with your home composting operation. If you have other questions, please contact one of our composting experts in DEQ’s Land Protection Division at (405) 702-5100.

In general, all solid waste must be disposed at a facility permitted by DEQ. A list of currently-permitted disposal facilities can be found here.

Oklahoma statues do allow an individual to dispose of his own household waste on his own property when all of the following conditions are satisfied:

  • the property is owned by the individual; and
  • the waste does not originate from business or commercial activities (whether at the individual’s home or at another location); and
  • disposal on the property does not violate any local government ordinance, create a nuisance, or present a hazard to public health or the environment.

Burning of household waste is generally prohibited unless there is no trash collection and disposal service reasonably available. Today, most rural areas of Oklahoma have trash collection and disposal services available. Where burning of household waste is authorized, the burning must be done according to the requirements set out in the FAQ on Burning.

If you have other questions, please contact DEQ’s Solid Waste Program at (405) 702-5100.

For complete information, please go to our Environmental Assessment & Reviews page.

Illegal dumping of waste presents several environmental and health risks, and is an eyesore. To report illegal dumping, please contact DEQ’s 24-hour complaints office either online or at (800) 522-0206. Include as much information as possible.

Come grow your career with DEQ! If you have specific skills, experience, or a degree in a physical, chemical, or biological science, engineering, business administration, finance or accounting, DEQ is the place for you! Check out our current openings, then apply!

EPA promulgated the Lead and Copper Rule in 1991 to protect public health by minimizing lead and copper levels in drinking water. Exposure to lead can cause damage to the brain, red blood cells, and kidneys, especially in young children. Exposure to copper can cause stomach and intestinal distress and liver and kidney damage. Because lead and copper in drinking water is mainly due to corrosion of service lines and household plumbing, tap water samples are collected at kitchen or bathroom taps of residences and other buildings. If lead or copper action levels are exceeded in more than 10% of customer taps sampled, the public water supply system must undertake corrective action to control corrosion.  DEQ has prepared an informative fact sheet about lead in drinking water. If you have additional questions, please contact DEQ’s Water Quality Division at (405) 702-8100 and ask to speak with someone in our Public Water Supply Compliance Program.

If you need to contact your local DEQ representative, go to our local offices webpage and click on the county in which you live.

All media inquiries should be directed to Erin Hatfield, DEQ’s Communications Director by email or at (405) 702-7119.

Today, it is not uncommon for citizens to give themselves injections at home for a variety of medical conditions; however, disposing of used needles with your regular trash is not the best solution. First, it’s illegal. State statutes prohibit untreated sharps from being disposed in the trash, regardless of the source of the sharps. It is also dangerous to the people who handle your household trash due to the potential for needle sticks and disease transmission. Fortunately, inexpensive solutions exist. Please review the Safe Sharps Disposal fact sheet, a joint effort by DEQ and the Product Stewardship Institute, to learn more about safely handling your used sharps. If you still have questions, please contact one of our medical waste experts in DEQ’s Land Protection Division at (405) 702-5100.

 

Mold produces a musty odor that may be the first indication of a problem. To find mold, examine areas for visible signs of mold growth and water staining. Other clues include excess moisture and water damage. It may be necessary to look behind and underneath surfaces, such as carpets, wallpaper, cabinets, and walls. Unfortunately, there is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in an indoor environment. The way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.

Oklahoma does not have a licensing or certification program for mold testing or cleanup companies, or individuals offering such services. Ultimately, it is the responsibility of the property owner to prevent mold and to cleanup mold if present. DEQ has prepared a fact sheet that discusses mold and offers suggestions for cleanup.

To find out for sure whether or not mold is present, you may wish to contact a mold testing company. DEQ does not maintain such a list, but you may be able to look online to find a reputable company in your area. Additional mold information may be obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

If you are a renter with a mold problem, first contact your landlord to see if he will correct the problem. As a renter, you have certain rights to ensure your residence is livable.

There are no state or federal regulations for odors; however, bad odors can sometimes be caused by improper activities for which DEQ has jurisdiction. Contact DEQ’s Environmental Complaints office, either through the Online Complaint Form or by phone at (800) 522-0206. Please include as much detail as possible.

DEQ’s operator certification webpage contains the forms, study guides, and DEQ contact persons.

Whether or not your business will need an air permit depends on many factors. Please contact DEQ’s Air Quality Division at (405) 702-4100 for more assistance.

The Construction Permitting Section of DEQ’s Water Quality Division reviews plans and specifications for the construction of all water and wastewater facilities, water supply lines, and water storage within Oklahoma. Sludge Management Plans are also evaluated in accordance with federal and state regulations. Permits are issued if the construction plans comply with all DEQ requirements. We have prepared a very detailed fact sheet of Frequently Asked Questions about the Construction Permitting Program. If you still have questions, please contact one of Water Quality Division’s construction permitting experts at (405) 702-8100.

Operators of construction sites where one or more acres are disturbed, or smaller sites that are part of a larger common plan of development or sale where there is a cumulative disturbance of at least one acre, must obtain coverage under the Construction General Permit, OKR10, by submitting a completed Notice of Intent to DEQ. This includes the installation or relocation of water or sewer lines that have the potential to disturb more than one acre. The authorization must be obtained prior to any activity that will disturb the soil at the project site.

To receive authorization, you will need to complete DEQ Form 606-002A and mail to DEQ with the appropriate fee. The current form may be downloaded from DEQ’s Stormwater webpage.You must also implement a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for the site.

We have prepared an informative fact sheet with answers to other questions you may have. If you have additional questions, please contact DEQ’s Stormwater Unit via email or at (405) 702-6116.

Questions pertaining to petroleum underground storage tanks should be directed to the Petroleum Storage Tank Division of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission at (405) 521-4683.

Records for Phase 1 Site Assessments may be requested from Central Records by email or at (405) 702-1188. Please be sure to have the physical address of the property in question and current/former names of any businesses associated with the property.

Properly disinfecting and maintaining your private water well are important steps to make sure the water delivered to your family is safe. We have prepared very informative fact sheets about disinfecting and maintaining your well. If you have additional questions, contact your local DEQ representative by going to our local offices webpage and clicking on the county in which you live.

Periodically testing the water from your well is an important step to make sure the water delivered to your family is safe. We have prepared a very informative fact sheet about testing your home water well to answer many of the questions you may have. If you wish to have your well water tested, contact DEQ’s State Environmental Lab via email or at (866) 412-3057. They will be happy to assist you.

Federal law requires operators of public drinking water systems to periodically test their water and make those test results available. If you wish to see the results for your system, go to Drinking Water Watch. Here, you will be able to search for your public water supply and see current and historical test results, as well as various other details about the public water supply.

If you have additional questions, please contact DEQ’s Public Water Supply program at (405) 702-8100.

Radon is a naturally occurring, radioactive gas produced from the decay of uranium in the soil, rock and water. It is odorless, colorless, and tasteless, and is essentially harmless at levels found in the atmosphere in most locations. It can become a health hazard if it is trapped and concentrated in homes and other buildings. EPA recommends radon mitigation if radon levels are at or above 4 picoCuries per liter. To obtain a radon test kit contact DRHOMEAIR at (800) 324-5928 or www.drhomeair.com/ok. The kit, return postage, and analysis are provided at no cost to Oklahoma residents.

Oklahoma does not have a state certification program for radon mitigation professionals. If you are looking for a qualified radon service professional to test or mitigate your home, you may contact either the National Environmental Health Association at (303) 756-9090 or the National Radon Safety Board at (866) 329-3474. Both of these organizations offer accreditation and certification in radon testing and mitigation.

If you have other questions about radon, please review our Radon Fact Sheet or contact one of our radon experts at (405) 702-5100.

Contact DEQ’s Central Records by email or at (405) 702-1188. Please be as specific as possible about the records you need.

If you are with a media organization, please contact Erin Hatfield, DEQ’s Communications Director by email or at (405) 702-7119.

DEQ encourages recycling as a way to conserve resources and landfill space. Please visit our Recycling Information webpage for information about materials that can be recycled and where, and other tips and information about recycling. If you have additional questions, please contact one of DEQ’s recycling experts at (405) 702-5100.

Discharges from septic systems are a significant health risk. Report such discharges to DEQ’s 24-hour complaints hotline either online or at (800) 522-0206. Please include as much information as possible.

A soil test must be performed before installing any subsurface septic system.  The two types of tests that may be performed are the percolation (perc) test and a soil profile. A perc test measures how much water drops in a test hole within a specified time period. This relates to the ability of the soil to absorb water.  A soil profile is a more scientific test to evaluate three critical aspects of the soil so that the most appropriate system can be designed for your property. DEQ maintains a list of certified soil profilers. If you wish, you may request that a DEQ Environmental Specialist perform the soil test by completing a Request for Service.  A representative from your local DEQ office will contact you to schedule the test. Please visit Soil Profilers/Soil Tests for additional information. If you have other questions or concerns about your septic system, you may contact your local DEQ representative by visiting our local offices webpage and clicking on the county in which you live.

Records pertaining to an installed septic system may be obtained by contacting Central Records by email or at (405) 702-1188. Please be sure to have the physical address of the property in question.

If you have other questions or concerns about your septic system, you may contact your local DEQ representative. Go to our local offices webpage and click on the county in which you live.

Oklahoma law requires a license for anyone engaged in the business of pumping, hauling or disposing of domestic wastewater (septage) from septic tanks¸ holding tanks, chemical toilets, or any other similar wastewater holding tanks. All septic installers, pumpers, and haulers must be certified or licensed by DEQ. DEQ maintains up-to-date lists of authorized installers, pumpers and haulers.

To apply for a license to install septic systems, please download an application packet, complete the application, and mail to DEQ with the required fee..

To apply for a pumper/hauler license, please download an application packet, complete the application, and mail to DEQ with the required fee.

DEQ will notify each license holder when it is time to renew licenses.

If you have additional questions, please contact DEQ’s Environmental Complaints and Local Services Division at (405) 702-6100.

Surfacing sewage poses a significant health risk. Please report surfacing sewage to DEQ’s 24-hour complaints hotline either online or at (800) 522-0206. Please include as much information as possible.

For more information, please see DEQ’s fact sheet on surfacing sewage.

The Oklahoma Used Tire Recycling Act (Act) has been successful in recycling old tires since its inception in 1989. Before the Act, Oklahoma had millions of tires in illegal dumps across the state. Traditional means of tire disposal were no longer effective or legal resulting in few outlets for old tires. As a result of the Clean Air Act and Solid Waste Disposal Act, open burning was no longer allowed. Additionally, landfills refused to accept tires because they would float to the surface. The Act provided a solution to this growing problem by providing a legal way to dispose of tires. The intent of the Act is to clean up existing dumps, prevent new dumps, and provide incentives for recycling tires so that they may be used as feedstock for various products and energy production. If you have questions about recycling or disposal of your old tires, visit our Used Tire Recycling Program website.

Grand River Dam Authority

For more information, please visit grda.com

GRDA was originally established by the 15th Oklahoma Legislature in April 1935 and given the responsibility to be a “conservation and reclamation district” for the waters of the Grand River in Oklahoma. Those responsibilities also charged GRDA with building dams along the river for the purposes of hydroelectric generation and flood control.

In the late 1970s, GRDA entered the thermal-generation field as growing customer demands required more electric generation capability. That resulted in the construction of the two-unit coal fired complex (now known as the Grand River Energy Center). Today, GRDA’s electric generation portfolio includes coal, gas, wind and water assets. It generates and transmits electricity to customers via a network of roughly 1,200 miles of transmission lines and interconnected substations.

GRDA is governed by a board of directors comprised of seven members, including representatives from each customer class (municipals, electric cooperatives, industrial). Three members are appointed by the Governor of Oklahoma; and one each is appointed by the Oklahoma State Speaker of the House and President Pro Tempore of the Oklahoma State Senate. Board members serves staggered, five year terms. Two other members are ex-officio and represent the Municipal Electric Systems of Oklahoma (MESO) and the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC).

GRDA’s wholesale customer base includes Oklahoma municipalities (16), one distribution cooperative and five off-system customers located in Oklahoma and surrounding states. GRDA also sells retail electricity to 31 industrial and 49 commercial customers, mostly located within the MidAmerica Industrial Park (near Pryor). Directly or indirectly, GRDA electricity touches 75 of 77 Oklahoma counties.

At no cost to taxpayers, GRDA also manages, patrols and cares for the waters of the Grand River System. This includes roughly 70,000 surface acres of lake waters (Grand Lake, Lake Hudson, W.R. Holway Reservoir) that are among the most popular recreation destinations in the state.

GRDA’s administrative headquarters are located in Vinita, Oklahoma. Other facilities are located in Langley (Pensacola Dam and Ecosystem & Education Center); Locust Grove (Kerr Dam and Energy Control Center); Salina (Salina Pumped Storage Project); Chouteau (Grand River Energy Center); Tulsa (Engineering and Technology Center); Pryor (Transmission Maintenance Headquarters; Oklahoma City (OKC satellite office) and Cushing (Transmission Field Office). GRDA also owns a 36 percent interest in the Redbud Plant near Luther.

Main Number: (918) 256 5545
www.grda.com

226 West Dwain Willis Avenue
PO Box 409
Vinita OK 74301

Chief Executive Officer – Dan Sullivan
Chief Operating Officer – Tim Brown
General Counsel – Ellen Edwards
Chief Financial Officer – Carolyn Dougherty

LP Gas Administration

STATE OF OKLAHOMA
LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS ADMINISTRATION
3815 N. SANTA FE, SUITE 117, OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73118
405 521 2458
www.lpgas.ok.gov

LP Gas Frequently Asked Questions

Application for permits may be found on our website.  Otherwise, contact the office for information.

There are two methods to renew.  The first is by the old method using paper forms to be mailed back to the agency with a renewal check and the second is by on-line renewal using a credit card.  The second method is new and hopefully will be of use to our dealers.

In order to use the on-line method, simply go to our website and locate the link to the on-line renewal and follow the instructions.  You will have to renew each permit you hold independently for now but this will change in the future.  By doing this you are creating a data base to use in the future for yourself.  Your information is private and only available to this office and you.

New rules are in place for Class 1 and Class 3 permits.  All rules, including those approved by Governor Stitt by Executive Order and in effect as of June 2, 2020, may be found on our website.

All permits automatically expire on August 31 of each year and must be renewed if the applicant desires to keep the permit.

Form 4s and Rebate information may be obtained from the OK LP Gas Research Marketing and Safety Commission at PO Box 54889, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154, Telephone 405-879-9828 and Fax 405-424-1781

Contained in the Rules at 420:10.1.8 are the requirements for Insurance.  Please review this for your compliance

Cylinder date of manufacture and requalification dates must be checked when filling.  A cylinder that is past the requalification date shall not be refilled.

  1. Cylinders must be requalified 12 years from the date of manufacture. A cylinder that is out of date, must be requalified by methods prescribed in DOT regulations.
  2. Cylinders that have passed an external visual requalification may be continued in service for 5 years.

Due to the virus pandemic and emergency rules, this agency will not be holding regular safety schools, meetings or seminars, including management seminars in 2020.  Instead we will be producing a video to be placed on our website.  Companies can go to that, have all watch the video, take roll and send to this office.  Not perfect but under the circumstances will work on the honor system for this year.  Hopefully, next year we will be back to normal.

This will not affect licensing or permitting as long as this process is followed and you comply with viewing, taking roll and forwarding that information to the office.

Oklahoma Corporation Commission

For more information, please visit occeweb.com

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission’s Oil and Gas Conservation Division has primary jurisdiction over oil and gas drilling and production in Oklahoma, as well as over environmental issues related to such sites. You can contact the OGCD 24/7 at 405-521-221l. You can also file a complaint at this link: https://www.occeweb.com/AspxForms/OGComplaintForm.aspx

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission’s Public Utility Division has a Consumer Services Department that will assist customers of regulated utilities with bill disputes, quality of service complaints, cut-off notices, and other issues. The Consumer Services Department can be reached at 405-521-2331. Outside the OKC metropolitan area, call 1-800-522-8154. You can also file a complaint by going to occeweb.com and clicking the “Complaints” tab.

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission determines the rates of electric, natural gas, and water companies that are under the agency’s jurisdiction,  and also reviews the charges for fuel. Municipal utility rates are set by the municipality. While a few electric cooperatives have opted to stay under the jurisdiction of the Commission, most electric cooperatives have “opted out” of Commission jurisdiction, and set their own rates.

The price of fuel is not regulated in Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Corporation Commission’s Petroleum Storage Tank Division has fuel inspectors who conduct inspections of fueling facilities to ensure fuel quality and accurate measurement. You can file a complaint concerning gasoline or diesel quality or measurement by going to occeweb.com and clicking on the “Complaints” tab, or by calling 405-521-4683.

Commercial wind power, solar sites, as well as electric transmission lines, are individually governed by their respective statutes. The Oklahoma Corporation Commission does not have siting authority, but does have jurisdiction over the notice process and decommissioning of commercial wind power sites.  Notices and decommissioning information may be found here.

Yes, there are various regulatory requirements for interstate trucking operations administered by the Corporation Commission. The Transportation Division is responsible for interstate vehicle registration (IRP), interstate fuel tax licensing (IFTA), and Unified Carrier Registration (UCR). You may contact them at (405) 521-3036 or by email at TRIRP@occ.ok.gov, TRIFTA@occ.ok.gov, or TRREQUIREMENTS@occ.ok.gov, to learn more about these programs or if you have any questions about obtaining compliance.  Additional federal regulations may apply depending on the type of operation.

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission is responsible for ensuring public railroad crossings are maintained in good condition and is also responsible for reviewing any changes to signalization or closure of a crossings crossing. If you have concerns about a public crossing in your area, you may contact the Commission’s Railroad Department at (405) 521-3407 or by email at TRRailroad@occ.ok.gov

While the Department of Public Safety licenses wrecker operations, the Oklahoma Corporation Commission regulates the towing rates for nonconsensual tows. All rates charged to consumers who have a nonconsensual two must conform to an established rate order. For more information about the rates, or to file a compliant complaint, please visit www.occeweb.com/tr/nonconsensualtowing.htm or call the Nonconsensual Towing Department at (405) 521-3036. 

Oklahoma Department of Mines

For more information, please visit ok.gov/mines

https://www.ok.gov/mines/ – on the home page, click on the contact drop down menu.

Oklahoma Department of Mines
2915 N. Classen Blvd., Suite 213
Oklahoma City, OK 73106-5406
(405) 427-3859 Office
(405) 424-4932 Fax

Office Hours & Additional Information: Monday-Friday 8:00am-4:30pm

After Office Hours (Emergencies or Accident Reporting Only)
Non-Coal (405) 317-7023 or Coal (405) 439-9577

For Coal Permits – https://mines.ok.gov/coal-and-coal-combustion-forms-reports-and-publications. Then scroll down page under Bonding Forms and clink Coal Bond Release Guidelines referenced in the Regulations

For Mineral Permits -    https://mines.ok.gov/sites/g/files/gmc746/f/documents/2020/application_for_bond_release_-_fillable2.pdf

https://mines.ok.gov/oklahoma-miners-training-institute-omti

Oklahoma Miner Training Institute
1301 West Main – Baker Hall
Wilburton, OK 74578
(918) 465-1872 Office   (918) 465-4490 Fax

Mr. Clarence Stanley, Executive Director
(918) 465-1799

Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

For more information, please visit wildlifedepartment.com

Anyone ages 10 and older may complete the Hunter Education course online at wildlifedepartment.com and receive certification. Anyone may attend a Hunter Education classroom course, but only students who are 10 and older will be eligible to test for certification. Anyone age 31 and older does not need Hunter Education certification to buy a hunting license.

Anyone who is not Hunter Education certified may buy an apprentice-designated hunting license, and apprentice hunters must abide by accompanying hunter requirements.

Accompanying Hunter Requirements: A person 18 or older who is licensed (unless exempt) and Hunter Education certified (unless exempt). For big game hunting, an accompanying hunter must be within arm’s length of the hunter or close enough to take immediate control of the firearm or bow of the apprentice. For small game hunting, the accompanying hunter must be within sight of and able to communicate with the apprentice in a normal voice without aid.

There are two types of licenses for breeding birds or animals. With both licenses, you can legally breed only purchased animals and you must have receipts of the purchases of the breeding stock. Also, with both licenses, you need to have the facility built, inspected by the warden of the county in which the facility is located, and have your license in hand before purchasing your breeding stock. Renewal forms for both licenses are mailed to the breeders during late June.

The commercial breeder’s license is purchased when the breeder wants to sell the birds or animals he raises or his stock. The license is $48.00 annually and needs to be renewed by July 1st. With the commercial license, the breeder is given a two-carbon page sales receipt to use when he sells his animals; one carbon copy for the breeder’s files, one carbon copy to mail to this office and the original to go to the purchaser. An annual report form is completed by the breeder at the end of the year and is mailed to this office giving all the details or purchase, sales, deaths and births of animals being raised for that year.

The non-commercial breeder’s license is purchased when the breeder wants to raise animals for his or her own consumption, keep as a pet, or to release with permission of landowner. This license is $10.00 annually and need to be renewed by July 1. An annual report and sales receipts aren’t necessary since there is no sale of animals.

If a person intends to purchase animals from out-of-state to breed, he or she will need an import and breeder’s license from the Law Enforcement Division before importing the animals. We have a schedule that’s show which animals require an import permit from ODWC or the Agriculture Department and a breeder’s license from the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation.

To carry a handgun/pistol while hunting that is not a legal means of take for that season you would need to have a concealed carry license. If you are approached by a game warden or other law enforcement officer you will need to immediately notify them that you are carrying a concealed weapon.

Example: A handgun can be carried with a concealed carry permit while archery deer hunting. The handgun cannot be used to down an archery deer.

Visit https://license.gooutdoorsoklahoma.com or call (405) 521-3852.

The Oklahoma Hunting and Fishing Guide is an annual publication from the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC). Print copies are available from license vendors and ODWC offices across the state. The regulations can also be viewed online at https://www.wildlifedepartment.com

Oklahoma Energy Resources Board

For more information, please visit oerb.com

The Oklahoma Energy Resources Board (OERB) is funded by a one-tenth of one percent (1/10 of 1%) of the gross revenues received at the wellhead for oil, natural gas, casinghead gas or condensate produced from each well in the State of Oklahoma except for production exempt from the payment of gross production tax pursuant to Section 1001 of Title 68 of the Oklahoma Statutes. The assessment is voluntary in that if a producer or royalty owner does not wish to participate in the program, they may request a refund of the assessment paid. The refund must be requested before March 31 for the preceding calendar year’s assessment.

Yes. The OERB is committed to providing a practical and economical remedy for environmental problems caused by any remnants of orphaned and abandoned well sites at no cost to the land owner. If a land owner suspects there is an abandoned well site on their property, they should contact the OERB or the Oklahoma Corporation Commission.

Landowners are welcome to call the OERB at 1-800-664-1301 or fill out an application at OERB.com/restoration. Our staff will work with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission to determine whether or not your site qualifies for cleanup. For more information about the requirements visit OERB.com/restoration.

The OERB has nine different energy curricula for grades K-12. To receive the curricula and free materials, a teacher must attend a workshop to be trained in the applicable curriculum. After the workshop is completed, the teacher receives a kit of materials needed to teach the activities in his/her classroom, a $50 stipend and a free field trip for his/her class. For more information about the OERB’s student education program or to sign up for a workshop, visit OERBHomeRoom.com.

PetroTech is a focused technical training program for individuals interested in acquiring the knowledge and certification necessary to pursue a career in Oklahoma’s oil and natural gas industry. PetroTech offers classes in Oklahoma City and Tulsa. For more information, visit OERB.com/careers/petrotech.

To request a refund call 1-800-664-1301.

The OERB is always looking for dedicated oil and natural gas professionals to volunteer their time to teach kids of all ages about aspects of the industry. To get more information or to apply, visit oerb.com/education/become-a-petro-pro.

Oklahoma Geological Survey

For more information, please visit ou.edu/ogs

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS) is responsible for gathering and disseminating information about Oklahoma's unique geology to all. We work with Oklahoma's citizens, scientists, policy makers, teachers, and students on a daily basis, by helping them get needed information. 

Finding a meteorite is not very common, but they can be found just about anywhere. Meteorites are rocks from space that have traveled through Earth's atmosphere and landed on the surface of our planet. They are so rare because when rocks travel through the Earth's atmosphere at very high speeds, they burn up and if anything remains, it is typically fairly small in size.

However, while rare, meteorites are occasionally found on the surface of Earth. Many land in the ocean, but some end up on land. There are a few signs to look for:

  • Is the rock magnetic?
  • Does the surface look dark, smooth and glassy on the outside?
  • Does the rock feel very dense (heavy for its size)?
  • When you rub the rock on a ceramic plate, does it leave a streak of color?

Meteorites are typically magnetic, have a smooth outer surface, are very dense, but leave no streak behind. If you do see a streak, you most likely have a mineral on your hands. The minerals most commonly mistaken for meteorites include hematite (which leaves a red-brown streak) and magnetite (which leaves a dark grey streak). Both of these minerals are quite dense and can trick you into believe you've found a meteorite.

Feel free to send us photos and descriptions of anything you believe may be a meteorite. ogs@ou.edu.

We have different types of geologists who can come talk with your group, whether that's for a club, classroom, school-wide assembly, or other types of community programs. Please contact Dr. Molly Yunker, OGS's Education & Outreach Coordinator to explain what type of presentation you're looking for.

For questions regarding permissions for OGS publications, please contact OGS's editor, Ted Satterfield.

If you've felt an earthquake, you can report it both to USGS as well as to OGS.

To report an earthquake to USGS, please click here.

To report an earthquake to OGS, please click here. You will fill out a brief form and submit it to our seismic technicians. Thank you.

If you need to access core from a well in Oklahoma, well logs, production reports, or other information and data, please visit the OPIC webpage.

For general inquiries, please contact the OGS main office at ogs@ou.edu or call 405-325-1211.

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority

For more information, please visit OMPA.com.

In the 1970s, a group of leaders from Oklahoma’s municipally owned electric systems were frustrated with the rising cost they were paying for their power supply. These municipalities decided they needed more control over the future of their power supply costs. They approached the Oklahoma legislature about creating the enabling legislation to establish an authority that would give them this opportunity.

Through this effort, the Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA), a not-for-profit organization, was established by the Oklahoma legislature in 1981 under Title 11, the Municipal Code of the Oklahoma statutes. OMPA was created for the purpose of providing an adequate, reliable and affordable supply of electric power and energy to Oklahoma’s municipally owned electric systems.

OMPA began service in 1985 with 26 member cities, and has gradually grown over the years. OMPA now serves 42 of Oklahoma’s municipally owned electric systems. From the beginning, OMPA was intended to be a municipal organization, as it was solely up to the member municipalities to fund the organization and control its future.

OMPA is governed by an eleven-member Board of Directors. Our municipal board members come directly from OMPA’s Member Cities. Each OMPA Member City has an identified elector. These Electors elect OMPA’s Board of Directors at our Annual Electors Meeting each March.

Electric power for OMPA’s members comes from a variety of sources including Coal, Natural Gas, Wind, Hydro and methane gas. OMPA utilizes a strategy of jointly-owned plants for economies of scale. OMPA’s members are joint-owners of generating plants in Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas and Oklahoma.

All permits automatically expire on August 31 of each year and must be renewed if the applicant desires to keep the permit.

Form 4s and Rebate information may be obtained from the OK LP Gas Research Marketing and Safety Commission at PO Box 54889, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154, Telephone 405-879-9828 and Fax 405-424-1781

Contained in the Rules at 420:10.1.8 are the requirements for Insurance.  Please review this for your compliance

Cylinder date of manufacture and requalification dates must be checked when filling.  A cylinder that is past the requalification date shall not be refilled.

  1. Cylinders must be requalified 12 years from the date of manufacture. A cylinder that is out of date, must be requalified by methods prescribed in DOT regulations.
  2. Cylinders that have passed an external visual requalification may be continued in service for 5 years.

Due to the virus pandemic and emergency rules, this agency will not be holding regular safety schools, meetings or seminars, including management seminars in 2020.  Instead we will be producing a video to be placed on our website.  Companies can go to that, have all watch the video, take roll and send to this office.  Not perfect but under the circumstances will work on the honor system for this year.  Hopefully, next year we will be back to normal.

This will not affect licensing or permitting as long as this process is followed and you comply with viewing, taking roll and forwarding that information to the office.

Oklahoma Water Resources Board

For more information, please visit owrb.ok.gov

If you intend to use water for any purpose other than domestic use, Oklahoma law requires that you obtain a permit from the OWRB. Domestic use includes the use of water for household purposes, for farm and domestic animals up to the normal grazing capacity of the land, and for the irrigation of land not exceeding a total of three acres in area for the growing of gardens, orchards, and lawns. Domestic use also includes water used for agricultural purposes by natural individuals, use for fire protection, and use by non-household entities for drinking water, restrooms, and watering of lawns, provided such uses don’t exceed five acre-feet per year. Please contact the OWRB for more information.

The Groundwater Wells, Standards & Protections in Oklahoma map viewer features links to the OWRB’s water well log database and monitoring well data. Enter your address in the upper right corner and click on nearby wells. The well logs include information such as well completion date, depth to water, yield, and related details. Enter your address in the upper right corner and click on nearby wells. Please contact the OWRB for more information.

Visit the OWRB’s Beneficial Use Monitoring Program (BUMP) page to view the latest lake, stream, and groundwater data. Summary sheets provide information on a number of parameters and show whether or not a lake or stream is supporting its designated beneficial uses. Please contact the OWRB for more information.

The first step is to submit a preliminary application to the OWRB. For a Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan, contact the OWRB and request to be placed on the CWSRF priority list. Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan projects are recommended by the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality. Applicants should contact the ODEQ at (405) 702-8100 and ask to be placed on the DWSRF Project Priority List. Please contact the OWRB for more information.

If you are concerned about a dam near you, contact the OWRB and request the most recent inspection report. You will need to know the exact location of the dam or its ID number. Please note that inspection reports are only required for dams classified as “high hazard.”

Contact the State Environmental Laboratory at the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality at 1-866-412-3057.

Contact the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality using their toll-free hotline at 1-800-522-0206.

Fish consumption is perfectly fine for most waterbodies in the state of Oklahoma; however, impairments for metals and other toxics do exist in some lakes and streams and should be avoided. For the latest consumption advisories visit the ODEQ’s Hook, Line, & Supper page.